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Nov 27, 2023·edited Nov 27, 2023Liked by Anne Kadet

Book people are the best people! I think readers are inherently curious, so it makes sense that we would also love Cafe Anne. You help us explore a different part of the world than we would normally encounter. I find myself going through NYC now with an Anne-filter. I'll see something and think that's SO quirky. That's SO Cafe Anne.

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Nov 27, 2023Liked by Anne Kadet

I loved your article a lot, Anne. I can say i'm a book person because i love reading books and learn from them (my lullabies were the extracts of Persian literary masterpieces my mom used to read to me. And they absolutely helped me go to sleep. They also helped me at school). Because of this, i usually spoke bookishly, not colloquially, with my classmates and that was what drove them away from me (only people of the same kind understand each other, and in my case, there was no one else like me😭). My childish mind viewed this as sth bad, sth that prevented me from fitting in the school environment. But my adult mind views it as sth to be proud of.

P. S: if you ever want to give me a gift, i love books and ornaments more than other things😉

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Ah, I loved this celebration of book people *and* one-on-one conversations — somehow I'd never quite made the connection between the two.

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Entering an author's mind through reading books can make you a good listener. In fact the same skills of concentration and patience and observation needed to be a careful reader are those needed to be a careful listener. To use a Star trek reference, it's like the Vulcan mind meld Spock used to do.

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Nov 28, 2023Liked by Anne Kadet

Great column Anne. I’m definitely a book person and I’m grateful to have grown up in a home where they were, and are, valued. It helps keep the ego in check and broadens our perspective .

I’ve always believed you can never be lonely if you have a book. Maybe that’s something we could use to combat loneliness and sadness amongst our youth…a library pass and book clubs for them all.

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“While there are exceptions for sure, it’s generally the case that the more people involved, the dumber the conversation gets.”

Best and truest line from this whole post.

Also, the classified for the banana cat bed is so classic NY 😆

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I mean, it seems obvious for me (as I write a book newsletter), but I am definitely a Book Person. I also realize I am a bit overboard . . . but it truly brings me joy! I have an extensive spreadsheet I keep that tracks every book I own (2873 total), what format they are (mostly print, about 85%), whether I have read them, and slowly I am adding the years I acquired. Believe it or not, I do sort through them frequently to purge and refresh! I am realizing we evolve as readers, and it's okay for my library to evolve with me. I love seeing what I'm interested in now and how that has changed over the years.

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AI will soon stop being weird because once it's powerful enough, real life will be indistinguishable from a dream 😳

Something like "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard":

https://www.fadedpage.com/showbook.php?pid=20191008

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Nov 28, 2023Liked by Anne Kadet

I loved this issue for too many reasons to state here - thank you!

I enjoyed the segue into lucid dreaming. All true and good information for those of us who can benefit from that practice!

I share the optimism behind these words “because soon, AI will NOT be this weird.” I hope we are not disappointed as the future of AI unfolds.

Finally, I am curious how the banana bed advertiser is going to make money or break even when she sells her bed - after paying for the ad. If it is not sold yet, I recommend she raise her price so at least she can cover the advertising expense.

Thank you for the wonderful writing.

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"My running theory is this: book people are folks who enjoy an intense, deep, one-on-one encounter with another mind."

can't really top this

ohh and for the record NEVER apologise for Woody but i get you know that already his contributions to understanding the neurosis of a certain New York jewish state of mind were minor compared to just the millions of laughs he has generated for decades not to mention his many love letters to that same city jesus don't get me going on his nutty punishing ex and all that crap...as for Larry David i've seen his imitations of Bernie (whom i actually once knew) and a few shows and what a delightful human being.....is "Aharon" like him? lol

my favorite of the color subway AI's was the first....i mean what guy doesn't want to live in a world where every female face resembles in passing Sandra Bullock right? i think i spotted a mini Rachel Maddow too but no baby with squirrel tail was too distracted by the legs

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L

Enjoyed the piece about book lovers. I keep books of authors I love. I'm more likely to re read them. I'll keep beautiful books with gorgeous bindings and designs and books that possess beautiful language.

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I'm surprised at myself: I forgot to count my books, and I didn't weigh in on my book culling habits. Clearly I need to get my priorities straight and never, ever forget about Café Anne again!

I've just counted and I presently have 671 books. Jesus H. Nine years ago I had to clear out my mother's house when she went into care and it took me 7 long months, so I've developed better habits around regularly making sure to get things out of the house. I don't want my daughter to have to go through what I went through. I can't imagine how many books I'd have if I weren't constantly heaving them out of here as fast as I bring them in. I don't amass other objects in the same way, so I guess it could be worse.

As for deciding which to keep and which to cull, it's willy-nilly. If I read it but wasn't particularly impressed, it's outta here. If I loved it or it has sentimental value, it stays. Sometimes I'll get rid of certain books I haven't even read yet because I suddenly understand that I never will.

I like your theories on book lovers! It's true I do prefer "an intense, deep, one-on-one encounter with another mind" than say, small talk at a boisterous party (parties can be great, but not for TALKING). But I always chalked that up to being "highly sensitive" and an introvert (most of the time). I'm going to think on this theory of yours.

Lastly, I was very interested to read in your interview with Jane Ratcliffe that you have a great uncle who's an antelope, as I, too, have an antelope for an uncle. Uncanny.

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Nov 27, 2023Liked by Anne Kadet

“Readers who memorize newsletter content will recall” gave me a chuckle, and the AI art was delightful!

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David Roberts had a point about reading and listening. Then, Carol, there is was what you wrote: ‘I arrived at this conclusion after considering what movies and TV shows I like. While I prefer books in general, when I do enjoy something on the screen it’s invariably the vision of a single, uncompromising creator with an idiosyncratic point of view.’

No mention of radio (distinct from the modern podcast and audio books ). The comedy, the play, the 14 short story. They make me laugh, they draw me into other realities, they make me cry, but , as much as I love and enjoy all these things, a book in the hand trumps them all and now, at 79, I write my own. Imagine receiving Cafe Anne as a PDF and printing it off to hold... hang I can! I will send a PDF file before the end of the week. Forgive the length of this comment. aka Kevin 🐰

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Agree with your insightful observations, particularly about book lovers wanting deep, one-on-one conversations. It's fascinating that your newsletter is not about books but attracts book lovers. I love that! I tried to prune my (over-500) collection once and couldn't do it. Because I have fantasies of guests stumbling upon just the right life-changing book, from our shelves, when they visit, and I can't predict which of our books it'll be. I once read Lee Iacocca's autobiography because it was the only book in the car. I visited a beautiful friend's house when we were in our late 20s and she and her husband had no books. It was chilling. Super specific questions for your readers: Does anyone else not care for Jonathan Franzen's novels but LOVE his nonfiction (personal essays)? Also curious how many people here own copies of Fran Leibowitz's "Metropolitan Life" and "Social Studies"?

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Great question about book peeps. My sister is a big reader and we are close. She has great insight and self awareness.

Recently @juliasweeney mentioned that when she visits someone’s home she likes to see if they have a reading chair with a designated light. This can tell her much about the person. While I love this secret habit I felt a little embarrassed. I don’t have THE chair. Hubby and I have had to move so many times, downsizing and ridding our homes of furniture that I have no designated reading chair. I use the family room couch, my office chair or my bed. Alas, I am inspired to find the chair.

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